Tuesday, December 20, 2011

More Photos from Xian, China

In between training programs in Shanghai, China, I was able to visit Xi'an and see the sights, including the famous Terracotta Warriors. 

A view of the city wall in Xian from the road
(Photo courtesy NU)

Atop the city wall in Xian


The city wall was wide enough to walk on
(Photo courtesy NU)

Royal transport, now on display on the city wall in Xian
(Photo courtesy NU)

A view of a Xian street, taken from the city wall
(Photo courtesy NU)
A view of a park from the Xian city wall

For more photos of my trip, see the following posts

Gilda's Photos -Xian, China

Gilda's Photos -Xian, Terracotta Warriors, Part 1

Gilda's Photos -Xian, Terracotta Warriors, Part 2


Gilda's Photos - Xian, Terracotta Warriors, Part 2

The soldier behind me is in position to ride a chariot

According to our tour guide, each warrior face was different, and created
by a craftsman based on sketches from actual faces



The figures were destroyed shortly after the tomb was constructed
so as they are unearthed, they need to be reassembled
(Photos courtesy of NU)

For more photos of my trip, see the following posts:


Gilda's Photos -Xian, China


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Gilda's Photos - Xian, Terracotta Warriors, Part 1

In between training programs in Shanghai, China, I was able to visit Xi'an and see the famous Terracotta Warriors. 

The figures, dating from the 3rd century BC, were to protect the emperor, Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China.  They were discovered in 1974 by local farmers digging a well.  They are in the process of being painstakingly unearthed and restored. 


There are thousands of figures, including warriors, horses and chariots.

The figures were made of terracotta and painted. 
The paint faded after the figures were exposed to the air.



(Photo courtesy NU)

(Photo courtesy NU)


For more photos of my trip, see the following posts:




Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Monday, December 19, 2011

Gilda's Photos - Xian, China

In between training programs in Shanghai, China, I was able to visit Xi'an and see the sights, including the famous Terracotta Warriors. 

With a Laughing Buddha at a Buddhist Temple in Xi'an, China

The Hanyang tomb, resting spot of emperor Liu Qi, of the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD)
In contrast to the Terracotta Warriors,
burial objects unearthed in this tomb include clay figurines of farm
animals, people, tapestries and jars.
A display outlining the tomb.  Long pits radiate from the central tomb,
each representing a different part of the emperor's administration.

A burial pit, seen from above.
 You cover your shoes with plastic and walk on a glass floor
to see into the pits.

(Photos courtesy of NU)

For more photos from Xian, see the following posts:


Sunday, December 18, 2011

"I Don't Understand What Anyone Is Saying Anymore" - from Dan Pallotta, HBR

Harvard Business Review has a great blog post by Dan Pallotta about the meaningless words and phrases that creep into our business conversations (and presentations). 

For example, here is what he calls a combination of "Abstract Valley Girl 2.0 Acronymitis Using Meaningless Expressions"

"You should meet this guy with the SIO. He's sort of this kind of social entrepreneur thinking outside of the box in the sustainability space and working on these ideas around sort of web-based social media, and he's in a round two capital raise in the VP space with the people at SVNP." 

The next time you are presenting or having a business conversation, make sure you use real words with actual meaning so your audience can understand you. 

Read the rest of his post, "I Don't Understand What Anyone Is Saying Anymore" -
http://blogs.hbr.org/pallotta/2011/12/i-dont-understand-what-anyone.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+harvardbusiness+%28HBR.org%29&utm_content=Google+Feedfetcher

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Monday, December 12, 2011

Success Inspiration Speaker: Use Project Management Skills to Manage Your Life (Video)

Keynote speaker Gilda Bonanno explains how you can use your project management skills to manage your life so you can live more purposefully.


5 mins, 53 seconds

If the video does not play, click on this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvtoDJLxXhY


The opening of the speech can be viewed in the first  3 Success Inspiration Speaker segments:

*In the Path of the 2004 Tsunami

*Break Out of Your Comfort Zone to Live a More Purposeful Life  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmpsbvKLmEU

*Avoid Career Burnout - Recommit to Your Job or Quit Your Job  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcvUZDtbVeA&feature=colike

The remainder of the speech can be viewed in the 5th and final Success Inspiration Speaker segment:

*Human Change Management



Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Friday, December 9, 2011

If People Yawn During My Presentation, Is It Me?

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

Recently, I presented Bold Presentation Skills for Women in Business at a local business association meeting and someone asked me, “If I see people yawning and checking their watches in the audience while I’m giving a presentation, should I assume it’s me?”

Most of the time, it’s not all about you.  People may be yawning because they didn’t get enough sleep the night before or because the room temperature is too warm after lunch and they’re feeling sleepy. 

They could be checking their watches because they have something important to do after your presentation.  Or they saw someone else (even you) check their watch and they’re unconsciously mirroring the behavior (like yawning, watch-checking is contagious – try it sometime in a crowded room or elevator).

So, if you occasionally see your audience members yawn or check their watches, it’s probably not you.

However, if these types of audience behaviors happen frequently during your presentations, regardless of the time, topic or type of audience, then maybe it is you. 

Videotape yourself or get feedback from a trusted colleague to be sure.  And then, make some changes in how you present so you can be more engaging:

  • Make sure your content is relevant and interesting. 

  • Practice adding in audience interaction such as asking questions – not just rhetorical questions, but questions that you’d actually like some answers to. 

  • You can also have each person turn to the person next to them and talk for a few minutes about something related to your topic.  

  • Be aware of your non-verbals – be sure that you’re making eye contact with everyone and that you’re varying your voice to keep their attention.
(And thanks to the audience member for the great question!)


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Monday, December 5, 2011

Poor Presentation Skills Can Block Your Career

by Gilda Bonanno www.gildabonanno.com

A client shared with me the story of a woman at her company who was smart, talented and ambitious, but had poor presentation skills.  She was fine speaking to people one on one, but in the conference room in front of a group of executives from a client or a potential client, she would “choke.”   

She would get anxious and forget her point, then get lost in her notes trying to find what she wanted to say and not make eye contact with the audience.  Someone else on her team would have to jump in to rescue her and save the situation and the business. 

There was an opening for a senior executive position at the company and because of her technical expertise, she was a candidate for it, but management had witnessed her repeated poor presentation skills and she was denied the promotion.  Her career stalled.

Unfortunately, this is a common problem and demonstrates what I call the Success Formula:™ 

In order to be successful in your career, you must have knowledge AND the ability to communicate that knowledge effectively.   As she found out, knowledge and expertise are not enough; not having that communication ability can block your career.

The good news is that presentation skills are skills, which means that they can be learned, practiced and improved.  With coaching and some effort on her part, this smart woman can become a competent and engaging presenter – and snag the corner office after all!


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Friday, December 2, 2011

The Manager Who Paused Too Much

Recently someone asked me, “The head of my department pauses a very long time between words when he’s talking informally with us.  I find it very distracting and other people have told me that they find it annoying.  When he’s presenting formally to clients, he is very well-prepared and presents fluidly, with no long pauses.  Should I tell him?”

First of all, let’s be frank.  Giving unsolicited negative feedback to someone two levels above in the organization could be a “career-limiting move.”  So before she makes that move, she has to be very clear about the situation and what she hopes to achieve:

·         Will he be open to the feedback?  It depends on many factors, including how well she knows him and their professional relationship with her manager/his subordinate.

·         Is the “Long Pause” having a serious adverse impact on his performance and the department’s perception of him? 

·         Will he really change his behavior?

Since it doesn’t happen in other situations, he is capable of speaking without the long pause.  But the first step in change is admitting that there is a problem. 

I suspect from what she told me that this manager thinks the long pause is a virtue, not a problem. He may think that it shows he is being thoughtful and thinking carefully about his words. 

What also helps someone change behavior is an incentive or the threat of negative consequences for not changing – neither seems happening in this situation. 

So, it’s up to her to decide whether to tell him directly, share the feedback with someone who has a better relationship with him and can tell him directly, or just keep the feedback to herself and outwardly view the behavior as one of those personal quirks that requires tolerance in the workplace.

This case of the manager who paused too much is very rare.  Most presenters can pause more, whether presenting formally or informally, with a prepared speech or extemporaneous remarks.

Pausing can allow you to catch your breath, demonstrate your confidence, reduce and replace “ums” and “ahs,” and give the audience a chance to digest what you just said.   

The next time you’re presenting, record yourself or ask for honest feedback from people that you trust. Being mindful of how much you pause will help you get just the right amount of pausing for the situation.

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

David Gergen Headlines WBDC Business Breakfast

Recently, I was privileged to attend the WBDC 2011 Business Breakfast, Power, Politics & Purse Strings.  The guest speaker was David Gergen, Presidential Advisor; CNN senior Political Analyst; and Director of the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

He spoke to an audience of more than 400 attendees about the current economic situation, the upcoming political election and the power that women-owned businesses have for contributing to sound economic growth.  He was thoughtful, well-informed and sincere.

WBDC, the Women's Business Development Council, is an organization dedicated to helping women (and men) through professional developement, financial literacy and entrepreneurial training. Programs, classes and coaching are offered throughout Connecticut. 

I'm a member of the Board of Directors (and a past client) and also work with WBDC clients and staff on communication skills and presentation skills.  To find out more about attending programs, becoming a volunteer or contributing to the annual appeal, visit www.ctwbdc.org for more information.  

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Sunday, November 27, 2011

Patricia Fripp - How Can You Grab Your Audience?

Executive Speech Coach Patricia Fripp has written a great blog post about the importance of capturing your audience's attention in the first few seconds of a speech:

“Your first thirty seconds of your executive communications are like the first page of a book or first seconds of a TV show or film. If you don’t make an impact and hint at more to come, you lose your audience.”

Read the rest of it at http://www.fripp.com/blog/executive-speeches-how-can-you-grab-your-audience/


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Friday, November 25, 2011

Be Careful With Your Sources in a Speech

When you present, you provide examples, statistics and stories to support your message.  However, you have to be careful about what sources you use for your information. 

Just because you read it on the internet doesn’t mean it’s true.  And just because something is from a “study” doesn’t mean that it’s accurate or based on solid principles.  A survey of 30 people may not be a large enough sample size to get statistically relevant results.

My undergraduate and graduate degrees are in history and in those programs, I learned the importance of citing sources, both primary and secondary, so you’re not just making things up and relying on proof by assertion.

Earlier this year, in a keynote speech I gave at a Project Management Institute (SNEC-PMI) Conference, I focused on stepping out of your comfort zone to try something different so you can be more successful and live your life with more purpose. 

I quoted a study that asked CEOs to rank the top five leadership qualities needed over the next five years – and the number one leadership quality was Creativity.  I mentioned to the audience that the study was conducted by IBM, a reputable firm, and cited in PM Network Magazine, a leading industry publication.

I also made sure I knew more about it - it was a study of 1541 CEOS, conducted between September 2009 and January 2010 – and I concluded that the source was reliable enough for me to cite the study in my speech.

So the next time you’re presenting information, make sure you’re clear where it came from and what it really means.  You don’t have to become a statistician but you have the responsibility to ensure that you are not misleading the audience.  If you’re going to use data, be ready to cite the source and do your due diligence to make sure the source is valid.

To view the excerpt from the speech where I mention the study, view my video: Success Inspiration Speaker: Avoid Career Burnout - Recommit to Your Job or Quit Your Job (The video is 8 minutes, 21 seconds - I cite the study around minute 6)


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Thursday, November 24, 2011

A Serving of Gratitude

Today is Thanksgiving in the United States, a time for us to reflect on our blessings and express gratitude.

Here is a great article from the NY Times which explains how gratitude can actually make us happier and healthier:

"Cultivating an “attitude of gratitude” has been linked to better health, sounder sleep, less anxiety and depression, higher long-term satisfaction with life and  kinder behavior toward others, including romantic partners."

I find that it's helpful to be specific when communicating thanks - whether written or in person.  And if you're new to gratitude, practice it in small doses. 

Read the article here:


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Avoid Career Burnout - Recommit to Your Job or Quit Your Job (Video)

Keynote speaker Gilda Bonanno explains how to avoid career burnout by making conscious choices about your career and being open to new possibilities.

(8 mins, 21 secs)

If the video does not play, please click on this link:
Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Break Out of Your Comfort Zone to Live a More Purposeful Life - Video

Keynote speaker Gilda Bonanno explains how to overcome the fears that trap you in your comfort zone and prevent you from living with more purpose.  

(6 min 10 sec)

If the video does not play, please click on this link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmpsbvKLmEU

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Saturday, November 12, 2011

How to Stop Repeating Yourself When Presenting

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

Someone attending one of my recent presentation skills training programs asked me, “I’ve noticed that I tend to repeat myself when I’m giving a presentation.  How do I stop doing that?”

It’s a common problem.  While it’s helpful to repeat your message so the audience understands it, you want to ensure that any repetition is deliberate.  What you want to avoid is “accidental repetition" because it can bore your audience, cause you to exceed your time limit and make you look like you’re unprepared. 

Here are 3 tips for ensuring that you won’t keep repeating yourself:

Prepare
Have a clear message and know what your sub-points are. 
 
Get organized
Determine ahead of time how you will arrange, categorize and present your information.  Will you include 3 reasons, 2 points, 5 steps?

Practice
Practice saying your presentation out loud.  Focus especially on your transitions, which is where presenters tend to get stuck and repeat themselves.  How will you get from your first point to your second?

If you’d like to repeat a point for emphasis, that’s fine – just be sure it’s deliberate repetition.


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

How Much Time Does It Take You to Present?

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

One of the most common mistakes that presenters make is to go over their time limit.  Why?

Many people are not aware of how long it takes to deliver their presentation – and they tend to underestimate how much time it takes to get through their material.

The only way to be sure of how much time it will take to present your presentation is to practice it and time it.  Practice means saying the words out loud rather than just glancing at your notes and flipping through your slides.  Set a timer and note how long each slide or section takes. 

Practice a few times and you’ll have a good average of how long it will take.  You’re not memorizing your presentation word for word – you are becoming comfortable enough with the material that you can say it several different ways.

And in your planning, you also have to allow time for changes; for example, leave time for questions if that’s part of the program.  And consider that you may speak faster – or slower – when you present in front of a live audience. 

If you practice and time your presentation a few times, you will be less likely to underestimate how much time it will take to present.

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Monday, October 31, 2011

Video: In the Path of the 2004 Tsunami

Keynote speaker Gilda Bonanno recounts her experience in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and how it gave her a vivid understanding of the importance of priorities in life and work.

(12 min)

If the video does not play, please click here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FKAOBnYJa4

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Sunday, October 30, 2011

Humor Palooza with Ron Culberson - NSA-CT Meeting Nov 14


Ron Culberson, CSP: Humor Palooza - How to Discover, Develop & Deliver Rock-Solid Humor
National Speakers Association - CT Chapter (NSA-CT) Meeting  
Monday, Sept 19, 2011, 6-9 pm

Do you have a serious topic in need of a bolt of “lighten”ing? Is your humor falling flat? Are you funny, but don't know why?

In this session, humorist Ron Culberson will demonstrate six, maybe eight, maybe seven, simple steps to add humor to any presentation. He will show you how to find the humor that's all around you, how to make your really unfunny material funny, and how to deliver humor in a memorable way. Ron believes that humor is both an “art” and a “science.” He will show you how the understanding of both elements is crucial to developing an expertise in humor.

If you attend this session, you will…
  • Learn the different types of humor to add to your presentations.
  • Be able to find humor in your immediate environment.
  • See examples of how to make serious material funny.
  • Learn techniques for effectively delivering humor in a presentation.
*Note: No animals will be harmed in this session.

About Ron Culberson
As a speaker, humorist, columnist, and author of Is Your Glass Laugh Full? and My Kneecap Seems Too Loose, Ron’s mission is to help staff and leaders achieve a new level of success by combining the power of excellence and humor. He shows people how to have more FUN while preserving the integrity of the work they do and the lives they lead.

For ten years, Ron Culberson worked as a home care social worker, Manager of Counseling Services, and Director of Quality Services for a large hospice organization. These experiences taught him about the challenges of working on the front line, in middle management, and ultimately in senior management. He developed a successful career as both a member of a multidisciplinary team and as a leader.

Since 1996, Ron has been the Director of Everything! at FUNsulting, etc. In 2001 he received the Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) designation, the highest earned designation from the National Speakers Association. The CSP is the speaking profession’s international measure of professional platform excellence. In 2009, Ron cofounded Funner Speeches, LLC, a humor writing service for speakers, executives, and politicians. Ron and his partner put (funny) words in the mouths of those who speak.

Finally, Ron’s business model includes dedicating one third of his time to volunteer service. He is Vice President of the National Speakers Association (NSA) where in 2010, he received the President’s Distinguished Service Award He is a Past President of the Washington, DC chapter of NSA where he received the Chapter Member of the Year Award, the Capital Outstanding Speaker Award, and the John J. Daly Founder’s Award. He has served on numerous boards and committees including Capital Hospice, the Art Gliner Center for Humor Studies, and the Herndon Rotary club where he chaired two of their largest fundraisers. Ron has received the Rotarian of the Year, and the Four Avenues of Service Awards, two of the highest awards given.

Monday, Nov. 14, 2011
6-9 PM
Hilton Garden Inn
25 Old Stratford Road
Shelton, CT 06484

Free to Members/Associates
$30.00 for Guests

For more details or to register, please visit http://nsact.org/meetinginfo.php?id=22&ts=1319044231



Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Employee Learning Week - ASTD-SCC Dec 5 Meeting

Employee Learning Week - Hot Topic Roundtables
American Society for Training & Development - Southern CT chapter meeting (ASTD-SCC)
Monday, Dec 5, 2011, 5:45 - 8 PM

Join us for an interactive forum to learn and share best practices around trends in workplace learning and performance.
 
Brent Biedermann, Senior Director of Learning & Development at DHL Global Forwarding will lead a discussion on mentoring and share DHL’s success in this important area.
 
Steve Gardiner, Senior Director, Management and Organizational Development at Purdue Pharma, will share learnings from his work on team development.
Other table facilitators will be announced soon - on topics such as leadership development, eLearning and social media. You will have the opportunity to contribute to two different topic areas.
Don’t miss this opportunity to build your network and expand your expertise!
Date: Monday,  December 5, 2011
Networking: 5:45 PM
Dinner Served: 6:30 PM
Program: 6:45-8 PM

Location:
Hosted by the Southern CT chapter of the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD-SCC) at the Norwalk Inn and Conference Center, 99 East Avenue, Norwalk CT 203-838-2000

Price:
Members: $35
Non-Members: $50
Students: $20

To register or for more information, visit http://www.astdscc.org/


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Why Are There Onions in Your Presentation?

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

I love the following story, cited by computer programmer and venture capitalist Paul Graham when he was developing the programming language Arc, a Lisp dialect:

"In The Periodic Table, Primo Levi tells a story that happened when he was working in a varnish factory. He was a chemist, and he was fascinated by the fact that the varnish recipe included a raw onion. What could it be for? No one knew; it was just part of the recipe. So he investigated, and eventually discovered that they had started throwing the onion in years ago to test the temperature of the varnish: if it was hot enough, the onion would fry." http://paulgraham.com/arcll1.html (Nov 2001)

What is the moral of the story? Be mindful of the "onions" in your presentation and whether they still need to be there.

For example, are you using slides just because "that's how we've always done it"?  Are you presenting your information in a certain order because that's how your former boss preferred it?

The next time you have to present, identify the onions - and decide whether they still need to be included.

Thanks to vj for sending me Gary Tan's mention of this story- http://garry.posterous.com/if-you-cant-remember-why-onions-are-in-there

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Saturday, October 15, 2011

We're flying! We're flying!

I fly – a lot.  In the last 9 months, I’ve been on more than 35 flights, all throughout North America and to international locations such as Rio de Janeiro, London, Rome, Shanghai and Madras.

While I appreciate the complexity of getting a plane off the ground and safely to its destination, I’m usually blasé about it, as are most other passengers. 

Recently, I was on a flight from JFK to Chicago and we were first in line for take-off.  The plane was silent, except for the usual mechanical creaks and groans as it increased speed.  Just as the wheels lifted off the ground and we began to lift into the air, I heard the joyful and exuberant voice of a little boy sitting a few rows in front of me, “We’re flying! We’re flying!” 

Everyone around him smiled and I’m smiling as I remember it.  He was so thrilled and he reminded us all how amazing it is for this incredibly heavy and complex machine to lift off the ground and fly. 

His enthusiasm was contagious – and made me wonder if we can muster up even a fraction of that enthusiasm for our work, our experiences or our communications? If not, why not?

 (For more on what we can learn from children, view my post, To Learn More, Be Like a Child & Ask Questions)

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Video: What's the Story of Your Presentation?

Professional speaker and presentation skills coach Gilda Bonanno explains how thinking of your presentation as a story can help you be a more powerful presenter.   www.gildabonanno.com



if this video does not play, please click here:  http://youtu.be/BXcs6okgbT8 

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Sunday, October 9, 2011

Public Speaking Doesn't Exist in a Vacuum

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

Public speaking does not exist in a vacuum. The purpose of being an effective presenter is not to boost your own ego and talk just for the sake of talking.  The purpose is to share your knowledge, skills, experience, expertise and stories with others, with the sincere belief that it will benefit them. 

You have to believe that you have something worth communicating and that you are capable of communicating it effectively.

Therefore, improving your presentation skills becomes part of a larger strategy of self-improvement that includes building your confidence and your connection to others.  And eliminating any obstacles to letting your voice be heard – because we need to hear all voices, especially yours.

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

In Memory of Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs passed away today and the world has lost a creative genius and an inspiring presenter. 

One of his best presentations was the commencement address he delivered at Stanford University in 2005. Click below to view it.



"Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary."  - Steve Jobs                           
                     

(thanks to Garr Reynolds of Presentation Zen blog for the link and quote)

Friday, September 30, 2011

Video: Use Non-Verbals Effectively When Presenting

Professional speaker and presentation skills coach Gilda Bonanno explains how to master the elements of non-verbal communications  (eye contact, voice, facial expressions, gestures, movement & posture) so they add to your presentation rather than distract from it. www.gildabonanno.com


(6 minutes)
If the video does not play, click this link to view it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12TLZB75E90

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Thursday, September 29, 2011

The Hard Application of Soft Skills - ASTD-SCC 10/24 Meeting

The Hard Application of Soft Skills
Speaker: Joe Johnson, Talent Management Practice Leader for the Northeast Region, Right Management
American Society for Training & Development - Southern CT chapter meeting (ASTD-SCC)
Monday, October 24, 2011, 5:45-8:00 PM

Description:The differentiator for businesses nimble enough to navigate growth in this recovery economy is the very asset you may think of only as an expense: your talent.

It is time to shift from crisis mode to a growth agenda in this business environment unlike any experienced before. With a leaner work force and more global competition, it is more important than ever to align your talent strategy with business objectives and maximize workforce motivation and productivity.

In this session, we will:
·Provide you with recent research validating the return on talent strategy investment
·Demonstrate how you can transform your case for talent management into a compelling business case
·Reveal the options and tools available to you to accelerate your business' transformation from save-to-survive to invest-to-thrive mode

About Joe Johnson
Mr. Johnson brings twenty years experience in the Organizational Effectiveness domain to his role at Right Management. He has held partnership positions at IBM, Arthur D. Little, and Cambridge Technology Partners. Before joining Right Management, Johnson ran a $1.1 billion service line with 3200 consultants in 43 countries as the Global Service Line and COE Leader for Organization Effectiveness and Talent Management at Hewlett Packard.

Date: Monday, Oct. 24, 2011
Networking: 5:45 PM
Dinner Served: 6:30 PM
Program: 6:45-8 PM

Location: Hosted by the Southern CT chapter of the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD-SCC) at the Norwalk Inn and Conference Center, 99 East Avenue, Norwalk CT 203-838-2000

Price: Members: $35
Non-Members: $50
Students: $20

To register or for more information, visit http://www.astdscc.org/


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

"The Master Negotiator" Greg Williams - NSA-CT 10/17 Meeting

Greg Williams: How to Read & Use Body Language When Negotiating
National Speakers Association - CT Chapter (NSA-CT) Meeting  
Monday, Oct. 17, 2011, 6-9 pm

Every business discussion includes negotiation. Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator, will share body language revelations that assist you in controlling and mastering the body language signals you emit when negotiating and in your personal life.

To accurately assess the other person’s plan, you must first consider the image you wish to project and the role that your body language will play. Then determine how you will cast the role you will play during the negotiation.

By attending this presentation, you will discover how to read body language and increase your negotiation skills. With your enhanced and new-found skills, you will be able to negotiate better in business and in your personal life.

The presentation will cover:
  • Explanation of what body language (nonverbal communications) really is and why everyone that negotiates should increase their expertise in this area
  • How to detect when someone is lying, based on their body language
  • How to ask the ‘right’ questions to progress the negotiation more expediently
  • Mindset: when negotiating, don’t assume the other person thinks and/or perceives situations the same as you
  • How to change your perspective (the way/angle from which you view situations)
If you want to jump-start or enhance your career, get more of what you want in your personal life, or just gain more confidence when dealing with people, you must attend this presentation.

About Greg Williams
Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator, is a people-oriented business professional, with an extensive background in the areas of negotiation, motivation and success strategies.

He is the author of the intriguing negotiation book, “Negotiate: Afraid, ‘Know’ More" and the soon-to-be-released new book titled, “Negotiate and Read Body Language: Negotiation Strategies to Get What You Want.”

Greg has appeared on numerous TV and radio programs, discussing negotiation tactics and strategies.

His new video DVD, “How to Read and Use Body Language When Negotiating” and his new audio CD, “Winning Negotiation Strategies Using Body Language and Physiognomics” are the latest entry of hit products that Greg has created, to heighten the knowledge of those wishing to learn more about negotiation strategies and tactics.

 He is past president of the New Jersey Chapter of the National Speakers Association (NSA-NJ) and was appointed by Gov. Whitman as past chairman of the New Jersey Business Development Authority.

Oct. 17, 2011
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Hilton Garden Inn
25 Old Stratford Road
Shelton, CT 06484

Free to Members/Associates
$30.00 for Guests
 
For more details or to register, please visit http://nsact.org/meetinginfo.php?id=21&ts=1316462504
 
Greg is also conducting a bonus session on the same day, 3:30-5:00  Negotiate Like a Master: Close more sales, make higher-dollar sales, and increase your client "satisfaction" with the deal.

You're always negotiating, both in your business and personal life. Come to this Bonus Session with your most pressing negotiation issues, past or future - anything from negotiating a deal with a client to resolving an issue with a tenant to fixing a problem with your business partner.

Get instant insights from Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator, into how you can be more successful in that negotiation. In a small group setting, Greg will show you how you can negotiate more effectively to achieve results such as closing a deal, getting extra dollars from it or saving a client or personal relationship.

For more details or for separate registration,  visit http://nsact.org/meetinginfo.php?id=30&ts=1317041056

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

How to Schmooze Class



How to Schmooze - Stamford, CT - taught by Gilda Bonanno
Hate networking events because you never know what to say? Do you get stuck talking to the one person in the room that you know? Whether you're looking for new clients or a new job, or just looking to broaden your professional horizons, networking is a key ingredient of your success. This interactive session will teach you the techniques of successful networking so you can schmooze with ease.
Stamford Adult Ed., Monday, October 3, 2011; 6-8 pm
203-977-4209


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com