Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Learn How to Give a Successful Phone Presentation

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

The phone is a fairly low-tech tool these days and many people assume that if you can have a phone conversation, then you are capable of doing a presentation over the phone. But it's definitely not true that anyone who is able to talk on the phone knows how to make sure listeners stay tuned in, understand the information and act on it after the call ends.

Phone presentations are especially difficult because you can't see your audience and know whether they are paying attention and are understanding you. And the audience can't see your gestures or facial expressions.

For example, I tend to use a lot of gestures in person to communicate and I also like to walk into the audience if I can, so not being able to use that non-verbal body language over the phone made it challenging. I learned how to use my voice and organize my content in order to keep the audience engaged and connect with them. 

In my new audio course, “Virtual Presentations - How to Develop and Deliver an Effective Presentation Over the Phone,”  I explain this and other techniques for making sure the audience pays attention and understands what you're communicating.  For example:

* The best posture to use when presenting over the phone, and why (not what you’d probably expect)

* Tips for sticking to the allotted time, handling questions and learning from feedback
 
* Strategies for eliminating filler words such as "um" and "ah"
 
* How to deal with mild anxiety as well as mind-numbing fear
 
* What to do if absolutely no one responds when you ask for questions (and how to prevent this from happening in the first place)
* and much more....

For further information on the Virtual Presentations course or to purchase it, go to http://www.gildabonanno.com/Pages/VirtualPresentationsRecordings.aspx
 
Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Thursday, July 25, 2013

The Golden Rule of Communications

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

When you are preparing a presentation, it is important to remember what I call the Golden Rule of Communications:  “Communicate unto others as they want to be communicated to -- not as you want be communicated to.”

For example, if you know your audience is very focused on numbers, such as sales or net profits, then that’s how you would start the presentation.  

Or if you know the audience is comprised of people who are very focused on customer relations and customer issues, you need to include that in your presentation – rather than spending all the time talking about the data and no time discussing the customer perspective.

In order for you to follow the Golden Rule of Communications, you have to know your audience and understand what’s important to them. 

Maybe you know them personally or you know what department they’re in and can make some kind of generalization about what they’re interested in hearing about. Or perhaps you know how your presentation has been communicated or marketed, and therefore, you know what expectations people will come in with.

Whatever way you can, try to get to the heart of what’s important to the audience: What are they expecting from your presentation? And then craft your message so it addresses their needs and speaks to them in a way that makes sense.

I like to think of it as a language. So if your audience speaks one language and you speak another language, there will be miscommunication.  You want to try to speak the language that the audience understands, to the best of your ability.

Now, focusing on what the audience wants does not mean that you can’t lead them in a new direction.  You can provide additional information, and convince them of the importance of some perspectives that they haven’t considered.  But realize that you’ll have to work harder at it - and it will help if you also include what’s important to them.

As you craft your presentation, focus on what the audience wants to know and how will they best understand it.  If you follow the Golden Rule of Communications, it will make it easier for the audience to pay attention and be receptive to your message. 
 
To learn how to apply the Golden Rule of Communications when you are giving a presentation over the phone, check out my new audio course, “Virtual Presentations - How to Develop and Deliver an Effective Presentation Over the Phone.” http://www.gildabonanno.com/Pages/VirtualPresentationsRecordings.aspx



Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com
 

Friday, July 19, 2013

New Virtual Presentations Course

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

With globalization, off-shoring, some employees working from home and others at remote locations, the telephone is an indispensable tool for communicating with clients, partners, vendors and staff. But most companies provide no training on how to present effectively over the phone. 
 
People assume that you just "do it," without having to think consciously about it and without realizing that presenting over the phone is a skill that needs to be developed and practiced. The consequences are poor phone presentations where information gets miscommunicated, leading to problems, misunderstanding and frustration between people, objectives not being understood or achieved, poor performance, and people not paying attention during boring phone presentations while the person delivering the information assumes that everyone understood it and will act on it (but they didn't and won't).
 
To remedy the problem of sloppy communication over the phone, I developed an audio course, “Virtual Presentations - How to Develop and Deliver an Effective Presentation Over the Phone,” which consists of three one-hour MP3 recordings and PDF transcripts of the content.   For further information on the Virtual Presentations course or to purchase it, go to http://www.gildabonanno.com/Pages/VirtualPresentationsRecordings.aspx

Whether you’re presenting to potential clients or investors, shareholders, company team members, vendors or strategic partners, you need to know how to keep them focused on your message and motivated to take action.   With the Virtual Presentations course, you learn how to overcome the challenges of delivering a virtual presentation so you can confidently and competently communicate to any audience even when they can't see you.

“Virtual Presentations - How to Develop and Deliver an Effective Presentation Over the Phone” http://www.gildabonanno.com/Pages/VirtualPresentationsRecordings.aspx


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com
 
  

Monday, July 15, 2013

How to Give an Excellent Presentation

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

While presenting at the National Speakers Association (NSA) Convention in Orlando a few years ago, I watched dozens of speeches and took notes on what made each effective.
 
This post summarizes what I observed and outlines the 10 factors that can help you deliver an excellent presentation.

1.    You know your subject. 
It's obvious to me and the rest of the audience that you know your material well and can handle questions with ease.  You are confident but not cocky. It's okay if you use notes, but you are not buried in them.

2.    You communicate a clear message. 
Not only do you know your subject well, but you are able to focus it into a concise message that I can understand, regardless of my level of expertise. 

3.    Your message is relevant to me (also known as "you care about the audience"). 
You explain how your message relates to me and my experience.  Once I heard someone give a speech that consisted entirely of stories about his experiences with famous people, to which I couldn't relate at all.  I kept thinking, "how does this help ME?"

4.    You are prepared. 
You show your respect for me and the rest of the audience by moving through your points in an organized manner, speaking within the time limit and comfortably handling the room environment and logistics.

5.    You keep my attention. 
You vary your voice and body language so you are interesting to listen to and watch.  You make eye contact with me, you speak loudly enough so I can hear you easily and your body language matches your words.

6.    You care about your subject.
Your presentation or speech conveys your sincere enthusiasm for your subject.  You don't have to be jumping up and down in the front of the room, but if you don't care about your subject, why should I?

7.    You share stories and examples. 
Your stories don't have to be long or overly dramatic; they can be short examples or anecdotes that illustrate your message and help it make sense to me.

8.    Your slides are not the focus.
You remember that you are the presentation and your slides are just the visual aids.  You spend most of your time making eye contact with the audience instead of looking at the screen.  Your slides are easy to read and contain high-quality images.  (Or, you don't use slides at all!)

9.    You are authentic.
You are your real self instead of putting on an act or pretending.  You connect with me and the rest of the audience by sharing your real experiences and opinions.  And you're the same person offstage as when you're onstage.

10.  You're not perfect.
When something unexpected happens or you make a mistake, you acknowledge it with grace and humor.  And we are reminded that the goal is communication, not perfection, since perfection is unrealistic and unnecessary.

The next time you have to speak in front of any kind of audience, make sure you include these 10 factors, so you can deliver an excellent presentation.

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Thursday, July 11, 2013

Telephone Presentations Course: Old Tech Needs Training for New Uses in Today’s Dispersed Work World

In use in business for more than a century, the telephone has no glamour and sparks little training at most companies today.  According to executive presentation skills coach Gilda Bonanno, however, most people don’t know how to keep listeners’ attention during an important phone presentation, resulting in boredom, frustration, miscommunication and added costs to correct all that.  Bonanno’s new audio course, “Virtual Presentations - How to Develop and Deliver an Effective Presentation Over the Phone,” remedies this training oversight.  http://www.gildabonanno.com/Pages/VirtualPresentationsRecordings.aspx

“With globalization, off-shoring, some employees working from home and others at remote locations, the telephone is an indispensable tool for communicating with clients, partners, vendors and staff,” says Bonanno, founder of Gilda Bonanno LLC, a presentation skills coaching company.  “It’s definitely not true that anyone who is able to talk on the phone knows how to make sure listeners stay tuned in, understand the information and will act on it after the call ends.  I developed a course on this after seeing first-hand the negative consequences of poor phone presentations for both entrepreneurs and corporate folks.”

Bonanno’s new course covers:
* Energizing your voice to command attention when listeners can’t see your facial expressions or gestures and you can’t see their expressions and body language

* Structuring your material so listeners can follow the information more easily

* Deciding whether or not to use slides - and creating effective, easy-to-read slides if you do

* The best posture to use when presenting over the phone, and why (not what you’d probably expect)

* Tips for sticking to the allotted time, handling questions and learning from feedback

* How to handle technical glitches or interruptions during a high-stakes call - and much more

“Whether you’re presenting to potential clients or investors, shareholders, company team members, vendors or strategic partners, you need to know how to keep them focused on your message and motivated to take action,” Bonanno says.  “Business people can get much better at this and eliminate a common obstacle to their professional success.”

The Virtual Presentations audio course consists of three one-hour MP3 recordings and PDF transcripts of the content.  The cost is $397.  For further information on the Virtual Presentations course or to purchase it, go to http://www.gildabonanno.com/Pages/VirtualPresentationsRecordings.aspx

About Gilda Bonanno
Gilda Bonanno is a coach, speaker and trainer who helps people improve their presentation and communication skills so they can be more successful. She has worked with businesspeople throughout North America and in South America, Europe, China, India and Thailand. She is a certified Project Management Practitioner (PMP) and past president of the CT chapter of the National Speakers Association (NSA) and the southern CT chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

 

 

Sunday, July 7, 2013

Bold Presentation Skills Begin With Self-Confidence - video

by Gilda Bonanno LLC www.gildabonanno.com

Professional speaker and executive presentation skills coach Gilda Bonanno explains why self-confidence is the foundation of bold presentation skills



If the video does not play, click here: http://youtu.be/cn8pCgNu8Nc

 
Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Bold Presentation Skills: What Does It Mean to be Bold? Video

by Gilda Bonanno www.gildabonanno.com
 
Professional speaker and executive presentation skills coach Gilda Bonanno asks the audience what it means to be bold when you are giving a presentation



If the video does not play, click here:


Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com