Sunday, September 12, 2010

Presentation Skills Lessons from the U.S. Open Tennis Grand Slam

by Gilda Bonanno LLC http://www.gildabonanno.com/
Last week, I attended the U.S. Open tennis tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, NY. I saw some great matches and players, including Rafael Nadal, Sam Querrey, David Nalbandian, Samantha Stosur, James Blake (from Fairfield, CT!) and John Isner.

A photo I took of John Isner serving - he practices this serve daily!
I love watching tennis - and I think there are lessons from tennis that can apply to presentation skills:

PRACTICE IS REQUIRED
Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal are two of the best tennis players in the world and they practice for several hours a day. They never say, "I'm good enough, I don't need to practice anymore."

The same is true for presentations – if you want to give a powerful and effective presentation, you have to practice. The more comfortable you become at giving presentations, the more focused your practice becomes as you learn what specific aspect of the presentation you still have to work on.

A photo I took of James Blake (from CT!) - focused and determined
MENTAL ATTITUDE IS KEY
During a match, what the player tells himself or herself is important, especially when they're down a set and facing a tough opponent. If a player thinks, "I can't beat this opponent; I'm going to lose," it will be very difficult to overcome that mindset and win. Instead, when a player uses positive self-talk, "Yes, I can do this!" along with an energetic fist pump in the air, he or she is better able to access their skills, step up their game and have a shot at winning.

Likewise, what you tell yourself when you present is also important.  If you drown out the negative voice in your head and instead, use a positive phrase or mantra, you'll be able to present more effectively and confidently.

BODY LANGUAGE MATTERS
Two of my favorite tennis commentators, John and Patrick McEnroe, are always pointing out the players' body language – how players act between points, how they walk to the other side of the court, how they respond when they lose a point, etc. Negative body language sends a message to their opponent that they are giving up and don't believe they can win.

When you're presenting, your body language also sends a message to the audience – it should match the words you're saying and convey confidence and competence. For example, make eye contact with the audience, use appropriate gestures to illustrate your points, speak loudly enough to be heard and avoid nervous pacing.

The next time you have to give a presentation, remember these lessons from tennis to help you ace it.

And today is the Finals for the U.S. Open Men's Singles. It's going to be a great match and I can't wait to watch it!

Gilda Bonanno's blog www.gildabonanno.blogspot.com

4 comments:

AndyD said...

I was also lucky enough to attend the tennis. It's a great event.

Gilda Bonanno said...

Andy,
Thanks for your comment. Let's hope it doesn't rain in NY today so Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic can play in the finals!

TJ said...

Excellent parallels. And the good news is that it is much easier to give a great speech than it is to win the US Open!

Gilda Bonanno said...

TJ,
Thanks for your comment. Yes, giving a speech is definitely easier than winning the Open - and there are no rain delays!

The finals match between Nadal and Djokovic was a real nail-biter, with a little rain delay thrown in to spice things up!